Menu

   978 440 8210    

Current Topics

An Important Piece of the Pre-College Talk

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

When all the talk has been about getting into college, it's essential to dedicate some conversation around emotional well-being when away at school.

Preparing students for college success goes way beyond just the books.  It begins with communication.   READ MORE 

_____________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC.  Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com.

Boston College Un-Restricts Its Early Action Policy

Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Beginning with the 2018-19 admissions cycle, Boston College has quietly loosened its Early Action policy to allow students the option of applying via a binding Early Decision commitment at another college.

Previous to re-drafting its Early Action application policy, BC had in place a "Restricted Early Action" plan that permitted students to apply to the college under a non-binding early plan, however requiring that students refrain from submitting a binding ED application to other institutions. In acknowledgement of this more liberal policy, BC has posted their preference for students applying ED elsewhere to consider not applying to BC via an Early Action plan:

"Candidates who have selected the Early Decision I option at another college are free to apply through Early Action to Boston College. However, such candidates have identified that college as their absolute first choice. They have entered into a binding agreement to enroll at that college, if admitted and therefore are not free to fully consider a possible acceptance from Boston College. Thus, we strongly request that Early Decision I candidates consider not applying Early Action to Boston College."

According to the college, as demonstrated interest is not a factor in admission consideration an early application will not weigh in a candidate's favor.  For the most recent admissions cycle, BC points to filling 30% of its class via Early Action.  BC also offers the option of Regular Decision; there is no binding ED plan available to applicants to the school.

________________________________________________________________

Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC.  Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com  

ACT Soon to Become a Longer Test

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

With a new experimental section tucked in following its Science section, the ACT will require an additional 20 minutes of testing time starting this September.

It's not unusual for experimental questions to be included in standardized testing in order to try out new question types, gauging student performance and likelihood of correct or incorrect responses. This method of "testing" the test questions is designed to ensure statistical validation and reliability. The SAT too had long utilized experimental questions during test administration, currently providing their experimental section to students who forego the optional essay.

Testing Out the Test Questions

While responses to experimental questions do not count for or against a student's total score, test takers need to be aware of the extra time -- and additional stamina -- required to get though a 3-hour and 35-minute test, soon to be an additional 20 minutes longer.  While the ACT has displayed a modicum of courtesy in placing this section following the four main sections, including Reading, Math, English and Science, students who are signed up to take the essay portion need to save up additional energy and focus for this last piece at the very end.

________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC.  Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com  

Another Shift in the SAT/ACT World

Monday, June 18, 2018

When registering for the SAT or ACT, students are asked to consider whether or not to sign up for the optional essay. Since the number of colleges actually requiring the essay has been steadily decreasing as of late, it has been something of a toss up as to whether or not to advise students to spend the extra time and money to complete the essay component of standardized testing.  

Since students typically sit for these tests well before settling on a final list of colleges, there was no telling early in the game which of their intended colleges would ultimately require the essay. Thus, the safe bet has been to just sign up for and write the essay in the event that an intended college does in fact require it.

Recent Trend

Increasingly, the trend of late has been for colleges to no longer opt in to review the essay score. Over just the last two months with Harvard, Yale and Dartmouth deciding to drop their essay requirement, there are now only 25 colleges that still require the score.  It is worth noting that nine of these -- over a third --are universities of the California system.

However, there are a few colleges that still recommend the essay portion specifically for placement purposes (ex. Manhattan College and the University of Miami), however seemingly ignoring the score when considering a candidate for admission. While there is a larger number of schools that have a policy of recommending the SAT/ACT essay, the intended purpose is, however, unclear.

As to the list of colleges requiring the essay score, the names are likely to change as schools continue to re-evaluate their policies.  

Image credit:  Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC.  Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com  




Crafting the Personal Statement

Sunday, June 17, 2018


As final exam season begins to wind down, students turn their attention to the next phase of their application college process: writing the personal statement.

Unlike a typical classroom paper or analysis, the essay component of a college application invites the student to share a focused perspective or experience that allows Admissions a view into personal purpose; strength or character.  A personal statement can emerge from unexpected places.  Sometimes there is a funny story to share.  Sometimes there is a significant turning point that provides meaning to the student's experience.  

Emory University shares with readers examples of personal statements written by accepted students along with insightful comments shared by admissions officers who have reviewed these applications. Regardless of the story or the background of the writer, introspection underpins each essay. 
________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC. Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com







Hanging Out In Waitlist City

Wednesday, May 02, 2018

Decision letters have been mailed out and the National Reply Date deadline of May 1 is here and gone. It's time to heave a happy sigh because the college application process for most seniors is finally in the rear-view mirror -- but not for all. For some applicants, the final story is an inconclusive one if placed on a waitlist, meaning they technically are not rejected -- but neither are they accepted. From Boston to Seattle, Portland to Miami, the trend many students are seeing is not admission, not rejection, but instead one of "no decision."

What's Behind the Waitlist Game?

In order to manage yield rates, an ever-important factor that goes into USNWR rankings (and you know not to pay any mind to a magazine's rankings, yes?) colleges have increasingly been playing a waitlist game that serves only to help them manage their acceptance/attendance numbers. By waitlisting applicants, colleges afford themselves flexibility because they can later pull in additional students after extensive review of initial acceptees who actually take their offered spot. Striking is the fact that it is not unusual for colleges to waitlist hundreds, if not thousands, of applicants, in some cases waitlisting more than the entire freshman class population.

How to Approach the Waitlist

First, recognize that at many schools the waitlist is little more than a holding pattern. If offered a spot on a college's waitlist, students need to confirm right away their intention to accept a spot. And then what? According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, students need to carefully follow directions for next steps required by the school. In general, waitlisted students can continue to express interest by writing a brief letter to admissions expressing sincere commitment to attending and WHY; forwarding any new and improved test scores; updating strong final grades; a new and insightful recommendation; notification about significant awards or achievements.

Know that unlike waiting in line for a seat on an over-sold flight, there is no "position number" on the waitlist. Another consideration for waitlisted students, in addition to continued weeks of uncertainty, is the likelihood that financial aid funds will be spoken for by the time colleges comb their waitlists for possible admits.

Hope springs eternal in the world of college admissions but, because movement on waitlists is typically slow and infrequent, the best approach is to deposit where accepted, proudly purchase the school T-shirt and commit to attend. Most students would be gratified to know that the schools that have accepted them view them as a fit and an asset to the school community. So celebrate your well-earned success: Woo-hoo and congratulations to all our seniors and their families!!

Image Credit: Rob Dobi
________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and can be reached via www.achievecoach.com  



Um...Mr. Morgan?

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Requesting Teacher Recommendations

As junior year chugs along, Recommendation Request Season draws near. This is the time of year when teachers, not typically accustomed to students seeking them out between classes, find many stopping by with growing frequency and a shy “ask” in their eye. The sought-after payoff: “Yes, I would be delighted to write a college recommendation for you.”

For students who feel confident in their classroom performance and hold rapport with their teacher, requesting a recommendation may feel natural. For those students who have not yet made a strong connection with a teacher, there is still an opportunity to consider what they have gained from their classes and how it connects to their interests, whether present or future.


How Many Recs Are Needed?

Colleges vary in the number of recommendations they welcome. There is a surprising range of policies around this aspect of the college application, spanning as few as one optional recommendation from a school counselor to schools that will allow five or more from a variety of sources. Within the scope of recommendations, schools commonly request 1- 2 recommendations from teachers in academic “solid” classes rather than electives or arts classes. Additional outside recommendations may come from employers; coaches; volunteer coordinators — anyone who has known the student in a context that allows comments based on personal qualities such as leadership; maturity; impact; character; and more.


When to Ask

Asking early, before the end of junior year or early senior year, rather than up against last-minute deadlines demonstrates maturity as well as proper appreciation of the writer’s time and effort. May or June is a great time to approach teachers, when junior year progress is fresh in the teacher’s mind and the student still has time to boost engagement in the classroom.


What A Good Rec Sounds Like

It may be surprising to learn that a solid recommendation does not necessarily need to stem from the student’s highest performing class. Qualities in evidence may include engagement; work ethic, contribution to the class’s learning; attitude and drive. Student’s do not necessarily have to earn an A+ to demonstrate these strengths!


How to Ask

Whenever possible, requesting teacher recommendations is best done in person.

While it seems obvious, students should make a point to thank the teacher who has agreed to write on their behalf.  Students may follow up or thank a recommender in person, via email or — another personal gesture — through a handwritten note.

Perspective and Paying It Forward

While students sometimes agonize over whom to ask and what that teacher may say in his rec, keep in mind that colleges review applications in their entirety and recommendations are one corner of the multi-piece puzzle. Students: Be sure to thank Mr. Morgan for his time now — and check back in later during senior year to let him know where you’ll be headed next fall. This way, you’ll come back full circle, letting your recommenders know that their hard work has paid off, setting the stage for the next group of juniors behind you.

________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and NACAC.  Contact Marla via www.achievecoach.com


Khan's Got Company -- Here Comes ACT Academy

Wednesday, March 07, 2018

ACT Launches ACT Academy, a Free, Online Learning Program Designed to Help Improve ACT Scores, College Readiness

For students looking for FREE online test prep similar to the College Board's vaunted test prep and tutoring resource, Khan Academy, the ACT has announced the launch of ACT Academy.

ACT Academy is designed to offer learning tools as well as a program to support students with interactive approaches and a personalized study plan based on prior ACT test or diagnostic results. ACT Academy is slated to feature academic skill-building blocks among a robust collection of resources augmented by tips and strategies.

For more information about ACT Academy, visit: www.act.org/academy

________________________________________________________________
Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and can be reached via www.achievecoach.com

To Weight or Unweight the High School GPA?

Monday, March 05, 2018

The conversation can run both ways:  Does weighting the high school GPA create undesired competition among students?  Does an unweighted GPA accurately communicate to colleges the depth or rigor of a student's curriculum?  

Considering how colleges typically unweight and then go back and re-weight student grade reports, what is the best approach?  High schools are charged with how they can best serve students; colleges need to find a way to interpret high school grade reports when it comes to awarding scholarships and additional opportunities.   READ MORE


________________________________________________________________

Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and can be reached via www.achievecoach.com

What Happens to Students Who Back Out of Early Decision Offers

Monday, March 05, 2018

Buyer's remorse is a real phenomenon.  It's experienced when a sought-after object or goal that once beckoned brightly begins to tarnish once attained.  Such is the case when a student applies to college through a binding Early Decision (ED) plan and subsequently begins to develop second thoughts around the acceptance.

Although some colleges afford an admissions advantage to students who apply during the early round, with some schools filling close to half the freshman class through the ED pool, an early decision approach requires a clear commitment from the student and their family to attend if the student is admitted.  Students who are in a position to post applications that reflect their best or most developed high school achievements and are able to readily afford tutiton regardless of financial aid awards are candidates to consider ED.

For some, what may seem like a great idea during the fever pitch of an intense application season can turn into an "uh-oh, what did I do?" moment if the admissions decision is a "yes" and the student begins to develop second thoughts.

Such is why entering into an ED agreement is not to be taken lightly.  Reality being what it is, there are instances when a student simply has a change of heart.  More commonly, the family finds the school's financial aid package does not adequately address the family's demonstrated needBacking out of an ED acceptance is hugely frowned upon by not only the college but also the high school guidance department.  

Once a student signs off on an ED agreement, so does the high school counselor.  Pulling out of an ED acceptance can make the counselor appear negatively in the eyes of the college admissions office, thereby creating lingering consequences for current or future students applying to that college.

Other consequences may affect the student directly, depending on the spurned school. Some colleges will actually cross-check the names of the ED acceptees with schools of a similar ilk, examining if students had unethically applied to more than one ED college or did not follow other aspects of the ED policy.  In contrast, other schools simply won't care that much, determining that if a student does not want to attend that school, for whatever reason, then they should not do so. 

Ultimately, students should choose carefully and wisely and do nothing to compromise their acceptances.   READ MORE
________________________________________________________________

Marla Platt, M.B.A. is an independent college consultant based in Sudbury, MA through AchieveCoach College Consulting, providing personalized guidance to students and families throughout the college planning, search and admissions process. Marla is a professional member of the Independent Educational Consultants Association and can be reached via www.achievecoach.com


Recent Posts


Tags



Archive

AchieveCoach
College Consulting

marla@achievecoach.com

978 440 8210

SKYPE: achievecoach

Student Login

Except as otherwise noted, the entire content and design of this website is Copyright © All Rights Reserved, by Frisco Websites/Short Story Marketing and its client who manages and updates this website (www.achievecoach.com), and is subject to the terms of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 and other laws, as well as by the terms at http://www.friscowebsites.com/terms.html. Some images on this website are used with permission of their owners, and are licensed under a Creative Commons license. These images have been resized and cropped for suitable placement. See the image information for attribution. "Online Business Partner" and "Websites Under Your Control" are federally-registered trademarks of Frisco Websites/Short Story Marketing.